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This post was prepared by yours truly, with contributions from Phil Bradford, a financial web content writer. Phil graduated from New York University School of Law and recently joined Herald University as a reporter. He has also written for websites such as debtfreeguys.com and disabilitycanhappen.org

An now, on with the post…

Those who’ve exhausted their financial options or are unable to meet obligations due to illness, divorce, job-loss, or other life-altering events, may consider filing Bankruptcy to get their life back on track.  Here is a quick-guide to help you navigate the process with the help of a good Bankruptcy Lawyer:

Basic Types of Bankruptcy

The most basic distinction when thinking about Bankruptcy is the one between a liquidation (Chapter 7) and a reorganization (Chapter 13 for most people). Whether you need to file a Chapter 7 or 13 case will depend on several factors, including:

  • Total “household” income
  • The value of your property
  • What you stand to lose
  • What you intend to keep

That said, below you will find a few of the most important points when considering if Bankruptcy is right for you.
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We represent many consumers in Bankruptcy, and getting our Clients back on their feet afterwards is a big part of what we do. Often, cases are driven by upside-down home loans or even reasonable loans in which payments have become too high because the homeowner lost their job or had to take a lower paying job as a result of the Great Recession. One option for those who’ve gone through Bankruptcy and are looking to borrow again is the FHA Loan.

Before the housing bubble burst in 2008 FHA loans were considered the choice for buyers with little credit or bad credit; or an option for those with low incomes. But since everyone’s home value began falling – often taking their credit standing with it – FHA mortgages have become more widely appealing, especially when compared to conventional loans that require private mortgage insurance (“PMI”). PMI is the mortgage lender’s way of ensuring it gets paid following default. It is insurance for which the borrower pays the premium, adding to the cost of the loan.

For those considering an FHA Loan, keep these points in mind:

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So you’re doing business as usual and notice that payments from your customer are getting later and later. Turns out that customer is struggling to navigate in the sputtering economy. Waiting for your money is bad enough; but what if you receive a demand to refund what you’ve been paid? And not because of anything you’ve done but because your customer has filed for Bankruptcy?

Sound like a nightmare? Actually, it happens everyday. So what do you do if you’re next? That was the question addressed in the recent New York case of Davis vs. Clark-Lift, in which a reorganizing Chapter 11 Debtor paid vendors later and later as it listed towards Bankruptcy. But even those lucky creditors who got paid could not escape the demand of the Trustee (Davis) to fork over what they had received.

As the Court in Davis explained, to set aside a payment as a “Preferential Transfer” under Section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code the moving Creditor or Trustee must established that the Debtor made it:

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This piece from the Wall Street Journal’s Real Time Economics site answers the question with charts galore! The short answer comes in 3 parts:

1) For working people, 2013 was more of the same slow, jobless recovery;

2) For high net-worth individuals and corporations it was a bonanza; and;

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Where Did the Equity Go?

If you’re an Illinois homeowner chances are any equity you had in your home disappeared between 2008 and 2011; and hasn’t been seen since. If you’re lucky that equity may start crawling back to “normal” levels in 2013; but if you haven’t seen it happen you’re not alone. Despite recent reports in the news about recoveries in California, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Illinois property values continue to languish. Of course it’s not all bad news. For instance, as of January the overall price of housing in the Chicago area was up 3.3% from a year ago, with condo prices up a robust 5.8%. Then again, the Illinois foreclosure rate has merely leveled off rathern than falling as it has in other States. And as the “jobless recovery” grinds on, a few basic truths are coming to light:

The value of real estate is still well below pre-crash levels and many people borrowed against those inflated values. These people owe well more than their homes are worth.

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Yes Virginia, it is possible to both discharge unsecured debts forever (Chapter 7) and strip down secondary mortgages (Chapter 13). The result is a so-called “Chapter 20.” But should Debtors file two cases when it’s hard enough to put themselves through one? Read on and find out.

When Is Chapter 20 a Good Idea?

There are situations that fairly cry out for Chapter 20 treatment:

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Everything Was Going Fine Until…

Your customer or borrower has been paying like clockwork and you, the creditor or vendor, have been dispensing goods and services as promised. Then your customer starts to pay a little later, then later still. Why not? Times are tough. So you do the decent thing and take their payments without complaining. Next thing you know, your customer seeks bankruptcy protection, leaving you holding the bag for thousands, tens of thousands, even hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of goods and services. Money you’ll never see again. 

The Worst Part Is (Not) Over

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Written by Jonathan Trent and Mazyar Hedayat  Edited by Mazyar M. Hedayat, Esq.

Small business remains the backbone of the most vibrant economy in the world. America leads in innovation and hard work thanks in large part to small businesses and entrepreneurs. But despite the best intentions of their owners small businesses have a high failure rate; especially in the first few years of operation. 

But why the high failure rate? One of the most common reasons is that the business owner, entrepreneur, or manager of the business