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Articles Posted in Debt

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Gasunas vs. Yotis, 14-321 (Nov.24) ND IL ED (J. Schmetterer)

The Facts

Yotis, a former Illinois Attorney, borrowed over $50,000 from his Client Gasunas using various tricks and subterfuge: from outright lies to misrepresentations and material omissions of fact designed to manipulate his “friend” and benefactor. Once he had the money, Yotis filed a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

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In re Meier (Ch. 11) )(Nov.24) 14-10105 ND IL ED (J.Schmetterer)

The Facts

Bob and Martha Meier divorced and entered into a Marital Settlement Agreement (“MSA”) that provided for $4 million in maintenance payable in monthly installments over 10 years; plus a $400,000 property settlement. Bob filed for Chapter 11 sometime later and Martha filed a proof of claim (“PoC”) in the case seeking the rest of her $4 Million as well as the $400K as a “priority as a domestic support obligation” per 11 U.S.C. §507(a)(1)(A).

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The Announcement

Recently Steven Rhodes, the Judge tasked with managing the largest municipal Bankruptcy in American history, cleared Detroit to emerge from reorganization and put to bed a series of hard-fought battles between creditors, citizens, employees, and pension recipients. Before approving the move though, Judge Rhodes issued a heart-felt plea to all involved: “move past your anger” and “fix the Motor City. What happened in Detroit must never happen again.” He also observed that “Detroit’s inability to provide adequate municipal services… is inhumane and intolerable, and must be fixed.”

Politicians and civic leaders, including Michigan’s Republican Governor Rick Snyder, hailed Friday’s decision as a milestone and a “fresh start” for the Motor City. Indeed, it was Snyder who originally agreed with State-appointed Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to take the City into Chapter 9: a last-resort he had promoted during his re-election campaign.

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In the recent case of Beeman et. al. v. Borders Liquidating Trust et al. from the Circuit Court for the Southern District of New York decided on October 29, that Court examined what ought to happen when relief that could be granted, for practical reasons is not.

This controversial policy, referred to as “Equitable Mootness” means certain judgments will not be issued – even though they could – because doing so upsets the established order in a Bankruptcy case. It is obviously a touchy subject, but squarely within a court’s discretion.

Here, more than $17 Million had been distributed to creditors of Borders Bookstores in its Chapter 11 reorganization when 3 of its customers whose store gift cards became useless when it went bankrupt sought to be placed in a special “class” of claimants. The Plaintiffs started in the Bankruptcy Court but did not get traction there, so they proceeded in District Court.

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Recently I got an e-mail from the newly-formed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). You remember the CFPB, right? No? That’s alright. But you probably remember the agency’s public face, now-Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

So, after coming out of the shoot a few years with the President’s blessing and much fanfare, the CFPB has released the first of several consumer-friendly web-based guides. This one is its Guide to Owning and Buying a Home.

The 3 primary resources offered on the CFPB site are:

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So you’re doing business as usual and notice that payments from your customer are getting later and later. Turns out that customer is struggling to navigate in the sputtering economy. Waiting for your money is bad enough; but what if you receive a demand to refund what you’ve been paid? And not because of anything you’ve done but because your customer has filed for Bankruptcy?

Sound like a nightmare? Actually, it happens everyday. So what do you do if you’re next? That was the question addressed in the recent New York case of Davis vs. Clark-Lift, in which a reorganizing Chapter 11 Debtor paid vendors later and later as it listed towards Bankruptcy. But even those lucky creditors who got paid could not escape the demand of the Trustee (Davis) to fork over what they had received.

As the Court in Davis explained, to set aside a payment as a “Preferential Transfer” under Section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code the moving Creditor or Trustee must established that the Debtor made it:

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The Federal Reserve and Government forecasters agree: the Great Recession is over. But is it? Not for millions of Americans whose homes remain underwater thanks to the sub-prime mortgage scandal. Nor is it over for the millions more who lost their jobs and have only been able to secure part-time work with less pay and no benefits.

For many the ultimate insult is when their bank refuses to work with them and turns a few missed payments into a full-blown foreclosure. So here are a few options for those who want to know their options.

Alternative #1: Short Sale

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In response to questions we get over and over, here is our totally unofficial Guide to Discharging Taxes in Bankruptcy. We’ve gathered many of the tried-and-true rules on the topic but beware! The rules and decisions are constantly evolving, so take this guide with a grain of salt and always consult a competent Bankruptcy Attorney before making any decisions. Okay, enough disclaimers. Here it is:

Chapter 7 Liquidation

In a Chapter 7 liquidation Bankruptcy – whether an individual or a business entity – taxes can be discharged as long as:

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