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Articles Posted in Estate

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The Federal Reserve and Government forecasters agree: the Great Recession is over. But is it? Not for millions of Americans whose homes remain underwater thanks to the sub-prime mortgage scandal. Nor is it over for the millions more who lost their jobs and have only been able to secure part-time work with less pay and no benefits.

For many the ultimate insult is when their bank refuses to work with them and turns a few missed payments into a full-blown foreclosure. So here are a few options for those who want to know their options.

Alternative #1: Short Sale

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By Guest Blogger: Paul B. Porvaznik, Esq.

When you file for bankruptcy, you sign sworn schedules that itemize your assets.  If you fail to fully disclose or update your asset summary, you risk a creditor objecting to your discharge on the basis of fraud.  Another peril of nondisclosure concerns claims that arise after the bankruptcy filing; like future lawsuits.   So, what happens if a claim develops after you file your bankruptcy petition but before you are granted a discharge and you don’t inform the bankruptcy court of this claim?  That’s the question examined in Schoup v. Gore, 2014 IL App (4th) 130911 (4 Dist. 2014), a case that will doubtless serve as a cautionary tale for future bankruptcy petitioners.

 In Schoup the debtor filed in 2010 and obtained a discharge in 2012.  Several months into the case the debtor was injured on private property, giving rise to a premises liability claim.  The debtor didn’t tell the bankruptcy court or trustee of the premises suit until after his bankruptcy case was discharged. Indeed, after obtaining his discharge the debtor filed that claim. The property owners moved for summary judgment on the basis of judicial estoppel, arguing that the plaintiff’s failure to disclose the suit as an asset in his bankruptcy barred the post-discharge action entirely.  The trial court agreed and the plaintiff/debtor appealed.

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On November 1, 2012 Freddie Mac and Freddie Mae changed the prevailing short-sale guidelines that featured examples of eligible hardships that permit homeowners to sell their homes even if current on their mortgages. Ultimately that new guidelines enabled lenders and servicers to quickly and easily qualify borrowers. Let’s take a look at the main changes:

Eligibility Requirements

  • Mortgage must be owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac
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In June 2013 the US Supreme Court published an opinion arising from a dispute over the estate of Pierce Marshall – better known as the husband of Anna Nichole Smith. That case, Stern vs. Marshall, gave rise to a surprising decision; namely, that Bankruptcy Courts could not rule on the State-law aspects of a dispute even if they were before the Bankruptcy Court as part of the larger dispute. The operative distinction would henceforth come down to whether or not a dispute qualified as a “core proceeding” (i.e. whether it was the kind of question over which the Bankruptcy Court had jurisdiction).

Since the Stern decision was released in 2011, results across the country have often been inconsistent as Bankruptcy Lawyers and Judges attempt to apply this new set of distinctions and decide whether cases should be heard or referred back to the State Courts. In many cases, Bankruptcy Courts defaulted back to State Courts without much discussion.

In an update and clarification to its Stern vs. Marshall Opinion, the Supreme Court recently decided Executive Benefits vs. Ch. 7 Trustee for Bellingham Ins. Agency(Jun. 09). The opinion answered a number of questions that had arisen in the wake of Stern. In particular, the Supreme Court clarified how Bankruptcy Courts should proceed when faced with “core” claims that were now designated as “non-core” under the Stern standard. These claims fall into the so-called “statutory gap” in the Bankruptcy Code.

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This piece from the Wall Street Journal’s Real Time Economics site answers the question with charts galore! The short answer comes in 3 parts:

1) For working people, 2013 was more of the same slow, jobless recovery;

2) For high net-worth individuals and corporations it was a bonanza; and;

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A Little Light Reading

Are you excited to read about a dispute between competing secured creditors for the priority of their liens in property of the Bankruptcy Estate? Of course not.

Lucky for you issues such as these are generally heard in State court rather than in Federal Bankruptcy courts. Why? Because real property is considered a unique feature of the state and county in which it is located. Local features get local treatment.

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In Illinois, as in most jurisdictions, retirement funds like 

  • Pension proceeds
  • 401(k) accounts
  • 403(b) accounts
  • IRA’s and Roth IRA’s 

constitute exempt assets that cannot be taken away in Bankruptcy. 

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Where Did the Equity Go?

If you’re an Illinois homeowner chances are any equity you had in your home disappeared between 2008 and 2011; and hasn’t been seen since. If you’re lucky that equity may start crawling back to “normal” levels in 2013; but if you haven’t seen it happen you’re not alone. Despite recent reports in the news about recoveries in California, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Illinois property values continue to languish. Of course it’s not all bad news. For instance, as of January the overall price of housing in the Chicago area was up 3.3% from a year ago, with condo prices up a robust 5.8%. Then again, the Illinois foreclosure rate has merely leveled off rathern than falling as it has in other States. And as the “jobless recovery” grinds on, a few basic truths are coming to light:

The value of real estate is still well below pre-crash levels and many people borrowed against those inflated values. These people owe well more than their homes are worth.

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Yes Virginia, it is possible to both discharge unsecured debts forever (Chapter 7) and strip down secondary mortgages (Chapter 13). The result is a so-called “Chapter 20.” But should Debtors file two cases when it’s hard enough to put themselves through one? Read on and find out.

When Is Chapter 20 a Good Idea?

There are situations that fairly cry out for Chapter 20 treatment:

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Everything Was Going Fine Until…

Your customer or borrower has been paying like clockwork and you, the creditor or vendor, have been dispensing goods and services as promised. Then your customer starts to pay a little later, then later still. Why not? Times are tough. So you do the decent thing and take their payments without complaining. Next thing you know, your customer seeks bankruptcy protection, leaving you holding the bag for thousands, tens of thousands, even hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of goods and services. Money you’ll never see again. 

The Worst Part Is (Not) Over

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