Articles Posted in Mortgage

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BK Ct. ND IL EDIn re: Richard D. Olson, 16-01356 Chapter 13
Bankruptcy Court, N.D. Illinois, Eastern Div.
Opinion Date: June 22, 2016 Judge Schmetterer

This Memorandum Opinion addresses the feasibility and good faith of a Chapter 13 Plan of Reorganization filed on the even of foreclosure by a homeowner. The Mortgagee bank wanted to shut down the case and the Plan. The Court said “not so fast” and prepared a carefully crafted analysis of each objection filed by the bank.

Facts

Richard Olson filed four Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Petitions and Plans in a five year period- the last one on the eve of the foreclosure of his home. Ventures Trust 2013-I-H-R (“Mortgagee”), assignee of the Debtor’s original mortgage lender Bank of America, objected to confirmation of the latest Plan on the basis that it failed to comply with the confirmation requirements in 11 USC §§1325(a)(1), (a)(3), (a)(6) and (a)(7). Specifically, the Mortgagee alleged that there were inaccuracies in the Debtor’s schedules, that the Debtor had failed to correctly value certain obligations while not disclosing others at all, that the Plan was not “feasible,” and that both the case and the Plan had been filed in “bad faith.” In response, the Debtor amended his Bankruptcy Schedules to address some of the inaccuracies.

It is worth noting that the Plan under review in this case proposed curing mortgage defaults per §1322(a)(5) and reinstating monthly mortgage payments to the Mortgagee; as well as committing all the Debtor’s disposable income for the maximum commitment period of 60 months. General Unsecured Creditors are scheduled to receive not less than 2% of the face value of their claims.

The Court entered a Memorandum Opinion on the balance of the Mortgagee’s Objection before ruling on confirmation of the Plan.
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7th Circuit Court Seal

Jepson v. Bank of New York Mellon
Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit  Docket No. 14-2459

Opinion Date: March 22, 2016

This case is a testament to the subprime crisis and illustrates how complex and devastating mortgage securitization and pooling was to ordinary homeowners; middle-class people faced with sudden and insurmountable mortgage debt. Sadly, this decision also illustrates just how hard it is to stand up to the holders of pooled mortgage loans.

The underlying facts of the case are so common that the Plaintiff could have been anyone; while the tortuous path of the case up to the 7th Circuit – years after the underlying foreclosure and bankruptcy – left this Plaintiff financially devastated.

Factual Background

Patricia Jepson (Jepson) executed a Note and Mortgage issued by “America’s Wholesale Lender” – a d/b/a of notorious subprime mortgagee Countrywide – and Mortgage Electronics Registration Systems (MERS), its nominee. The Note was endorsed by Countrywide d/b/a America’s Wholesale Lender and transferred to CWABS, a residential mortgage trust operating under New York law that pooled loans and sells mortgage-backed securities sold on Wall Street. CWABS is governed by a Pooling and Service Agreement (PSA). Bank of New York Mellon (BNYM) was the Trustee for CWABS. MERS therefore assigned Jepson’s mortgage to BNYM.

When Jepson eventually defaulted on her mortgage – a common scenario in such subprime traps – BNYM filed a Foreclosure complaint in State Court. Jepson inturn filed Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. BNYM predictably moved to lift the Automatic Stay. But instead of lying down and letting the Bank proceed, Jepson filed an Adversary Complaint and Objection seeking a declaration that BNYM had no interest in her mortgage because, inter alia, the note did not proceed through a complete chain of intervening endorsements; was endorsed after the closing date in the PSA; and that America Wholesale Lender was a fictitious entity rendering the Note was void under Illinois law. Continue reading

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Seal_of_the_Supreme_Court_of_Illinois

1010 Lake Shore Ass’n v. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co.
2015 IL 118372 Date: December 3, 2015

The Illinois Supreme Court recently ruled on the tricky interplay between the Illinois Condominium Property Act and Illinois Mortgage Foreclosure Law. Both pieces of legislation are meant to give real estate owners, investors, managers, and ultimately residents, confidence that their needs will be met through the legal process. In this case however, the Bank was ultimately trumped by the condo association – even after the Bank’s successful foreclosure. The implications of the decision are stark if not altogether surprising: the condominium association always gets its money. Always.

Facts

In 2010 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. as Trustee for Loan Trust # 2004-1, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-1 (“Deutsche”) purchased a unit at a judicial foreclosure sale. On March 27, 2012 condominium association 1010 Lake Shore Assoc. (the “Management Association”) sent Deutsche a Demand for Payment referencing unpaid common area expenses incurred during the time the unit was owned by the former occupant. Deutsche filed an Answer and the Management Association moved for Summary Judgment; arguing that there was no question of material fact as to the amount owed or Deutsche’s failure to pay assessments.

Ciruit Court Opinion: MSJ

The Management Association argued in its Motion for Summary Judgment in the Circuit Court of Cook County that based on Sec.9(g)(3) of the Illinois Condominium Property Act (“Act”), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(3), the lien arising from the former owner’s unpaid assessments was not extinguished by Deutsche’s foreclosure because Deutsche had failed to pay assessments accruing after the judicial sale.

For its part, Deutsche responded that it could not be held liable under Sec.9(g)(3) for unpaid assessments that accrued before it purchased the unit. Following a hearing the Trial Court granted Summary Judgment and awarded the Management Association possession of the property. Continue reading

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Dual Tracking is the industry name for the practice of letting a foreclosure case tick on even while the homeowner seeks to modify their mortgage loan. The idea is simple: the Bank will take whichever solution comes through first – a modification or a foreclosure. The problem is that the Bank holds all the cards: the Bank’s Loss Mitigation Department decides how long it takes to review and approve an application to modify your loan, while the Foreclosure process in Court has been greatly simplified and streamlined for the benefit of the Banks. Illinois mortgage foreclosure laws, even Illinois Supreme Court Rules, now permit foreclosing banks to roll over homeowners and get to a judgment.

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If you live in Illinois you know that the Economy has been sputtering: struggling valiantly but with little to show for it. Case in point: Is your home still underwater? For most people the answer is still yes – even as markets around the country rebound. So today we address a deceptively simple question: What is a mortgage and how does it work? Why don’t mortgages relate to the value of our homes? Here are a few things to consider: a mortgage is a loan secured by real estate. While the term “mortgage” is used colloquially to refer to both the loan and the security, there are actually 2 separate legal documents at work here: a Note and a security instrument – the Mortgage lien.

Note: When money is borrowed to purchase real estate, some States title the underlying property in the name of the Lender and permit that interest to hypothetically transfer over time to the Borrower. The arrangement is a bit like lay-a-way. These States are using the “Title Theory.” But Illinois, like many other States, places the underling property in the name of the homeowner and gives the Lender a lien on the owner’s interest – these States are using the “Lien Theory.”

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Today’s post features a pair of cases in which a foreclosure defense Attorney seems to have gone too far. Foreclosure defense has become a veritable cottage industry over the past decade and it is common for Clients to expect their lawyer to do more than fight. They want to delay “by any means necessary.” But the Courts still regard the law as a genteel profession. This means that what Clients see as run of the mill zealous lawyering comes off to the Judge as unprofessional or worse. This pair of cases highlights that point.

Case #1: In re Wendy A. Nora

Facts

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We represent many consumers in Bankruptcy, and getting our Clients back on their feet afterwards is a big part of what we do. Often, cases are driven by upside-down home loans or even reasonable loans in which payments have become too high because the homeowner lost their job or had to take a lower paying job as a result of the Great Recession. One option for those who’ve gone through Bankruptcy and are looking to borrow again is the FHA Loan.

Before the housing bubble burst in 2008 FHA loans were considered the choice for buyers with little credit or bad credit; or an option for those with low incomes. But since everyone’s home value began falling – often taking their credit standing with it – FHA mortgages have become more widely appealing, especially when compared to conventional loans that require private mortgage insurance (“PMI”). PMI is the mortgage lender’s way of ensuring it gets paid following default. It is insurance for which the borrower pays the premium, adding to the cost of the loan.

For those considering an FHA Loan, keep these points in mind:

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As a Bankruptcy lawyer I can’t count how many times people have asked why Courts won’t reduce their mortgage debt to match the deflated value of their home, or why they should pay anything on that second mortgage, line of credit, or HELOC, when they’re underwater. I even discussed these questions and the state of the law concerning lien strips in this post. Now, the very cases referred to in that post have made it to the U.S. Supreme Court and the stage is set for the battle of the lien strip cases.

Of course this all started with the Supreme Court’s 1992 Opinion in Dewsnup v. Timm that the Bankruptcy Code does not permit the cramdown of a partially secured mortgage. Some Courts took this to mean that lien-strips are a no-no. Others interpreted it to mean that lien-strips were permissible under the right circumstances. So in some parts of the country a completely unsecured second mortgage can be stripped, but only in a Chapter 13 reorganization; while in other parts it can be stripped in a Chapter 7 liquidation, too.

So, with Courts in disagreement, what’s a home-owner to do? Remember, in Dewsnup the Court ruled the Bankruptcy Code doesn’t permit mortgages to be written down to the value of the home – even though that practice, known as the cram down,  is acceptable as to vehicles. Ironically, one of the Court’s primary concerns in Dewsnup was to prevent windfall gains to home-owners who strip away their loans, then enjoy the profits as their homes rise in value.

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Recently I got an e-mail from the newly-formed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). You remember the CFPB, right? No? That’s alright. But you probably remember the agency’s public face, now-Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

So, after coming out of the shoot a few years with the President’s blessing and much fanfare, the CFPB has released the first of several consumer-friendly web-based guides. This one is its Guide to Owning and Buying a Home.

The 3 primary resources offered on the CFPB site are: