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Articles Tagged with Opinion

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Baker Botts L.L.P. v. ASARCO LLC, 14-109 (Jun 15) U.S. Sup.Ct.

Background

ASARCO hired the plaintiff law firms to assist it in carrying out its duties as a Chapter 11 Debtor in Possession (DiP) per 11 U.S.C. 327(a). When ASARCO emerged from Bankruptcy the law firms filed Fee Applications pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 330(a)(1), which permits the Bankruptcy Court to “award …reasonable compensation for actual, necessary services” by professionals.

Lower Court Rulings

ASARCO objected to the Fee Applications brought by its Attorneys. The Bankruptcy Court rejected ASARCO’s objections and went on to award fees for time spent defending the Fee Applications. On appeal from the Bankruptcy Court Order, The District Court held that the Law Firms could be awarded fees for defending their Fee Applications. On appeal from the District Court’s Order, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed. Continue reading

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Today’s post features a pair of cases in which a foreclosure defense Attorney seems to have gone too far. Foreclosure defense has become a veritable cottage industry over the past decade and it is common for Clients to expect their lawyer to do more than fight. They want to delay “by any means necessary.” But the Courts still regard the law as a genteel profession. This means that what Clients see as run of the mill zealous lawyering comes off to the Judge as unprofessional or worse. This pair of cases highlights that point.

Case #1: In re Wendy A. Nora

Facts

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Gasunas vs. Yotis, 14-321 (Nov.24) ND IL ED (J. Schmetterer)

The Facts

Yotis, a former Illinois Attorney, borrowed over $50,000 from his Client Gasunas using various tricks and subterfuge: from outright lies to misrepresentations and material omissions of fact designed to manipulate his “friend” and benefactor. Once he had the money, Yotis filed a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

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In the recent case of Beeman et. al. v. Borders Liquidating Trust et al. from the Circuit Court for the Southern District of New York decided on October 29, that Court examined what ought to happen when relief that could be granted, for practical reasons is not.

This controversial policy, referred to as “Equitable Mootness” means certain judgments will not be issued – even though they could – because doing so upsets the established order in a Bankruptcy case. It is obviously a touchy subject, but squarely within a court’s discretion.

Here, more than $17 Million had been distributed to creditors of Borders Bookstores in its Chapter 11 reorganization when 3 of its customers whose store gift cards became useless when it went bankrupt sought to be placed in a special “class” of claimants. The Plaintiffs started in the Bankruptcy Court but did not get traction there, so they proceeded in District Court.

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So you’re doing business as usual and notice that payments from your customer are getting later and later. Turns out that customer is struggling to navigate in the sputtering economy. Waiting for your money is bad enough; but what if you receive a demand to refund what you’ve been paid? And not because of anything you’ve done but because your customer has filed for Bankruptcy?

Sound like a nightmare? Actually, it happens everyday. So what do you do if you’re next? That was the question addressed in the recent New York case of Davis vs. Clark-Lift, in which a reorganizing Chapter 11 Debtor paid vendors later and later as it listed towards Bankruptcy. But even those lucky creditors who got paid could not escape the demand of the Trustee (Davis) to fork over what they had received.

As the Court in Davis explained, to set aside a payment as a “Preferential Transfer” under Section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code the moving Creditor or Trustee must established that the Debtor made it:

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In LaSalle Bank N.A. vs. Cypress Creek 1, LP (Edon Construction et al.), 950 N.E.2d 1109 (2011), 242 Ill.2d 231 (Feb. 25, 2011), the Illinois Supreme Court ruled on the thorny problem of how to apportion proceeds from a foreclosure sale between the mortgagee bank and mechanics lien claimants when there weren’t enough proceeds arising from the foreclosure sale to pay both in full. In other words, who gets paid and who gets the shaft according to Sec. 16 of the Illinois Mechanics Lien Act?

Holdings

Here’s what the Court decided:

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In Illinois, as in most jurisdictions, retirement funds like 

  • Pension proceeds
  • 401(k) accounts
  • 403(b) accounts
  • IRA’s and Roth IRA’s 

constitute exempt assets that cannot be taken away in Bankruptcy. 

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