Articles Tagged with reorganization

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When a business becomes unable to meet obligations such as employee salaries, day to day invoices, and bank debt, management may turn to Bankruptcy law to liquidate or reorganize. As a rule, Courts prefer reorganization over liquidation, provided reorganization would be viable, preserve jobs, keep assets productive, and enhance the local economy. To begin with though, the question of whether Bankruptcy is the best way to deal with business challenges depends on several factors, including:

  • The form of the business (sole proprietor, partnership, corporation, LLC, etc.)
  • Whether the person(s) behind the market are also personally liable for debts
  • The number, amount, and type of debts that were incurred by the company
  • Whether it makes more sense to close the business or to keep it running

There are three basic types of Bankruptcy available for businesses: Chapter 7 liquidation, Chapter 11 reorganization, and Chapter 13 reorganization for sole proprietors. Continue reading

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7th Circuit Court Seal

EAR vs. Brandt/Brandt vs. Horseshoe Hammond, 14‐2174
Appeal from District Court (ND IL ED) 12‐cv‐00271
Decided Oct. 13, 2015

Introduction

In an Adversary Proceeding in the Chapter 11 Bankruptcy case of Equipment Acquisition Resources (EAR), Plan Administrator William Brandt (Brand) sought to avoid and recover the so-called “fraudulent transfers” made to EAR’s founder that he subsequently lost gambling at Horseshoe Casino.

Facts

EAR was established in 1997 to manufacture and refurbish machinery for use in creating technology products. Beginning in 2005 however, it also began defrauding creditors through crooked equipment financing activities. As a result, founder Sheldon Player and a company Officer named Malone pocketed about $17 Million each.

It was not until September 2009 that an outside forensic accounting firm hired by EAR’s Board of Directors detected the fraud. In response to the revelation about the wrongdoing, the company’s Board and all Officers resigned. EAR’s shareholders then elected William Brandt as the sole Board Member and Chief Restructuring Officer. Shortly thereafter the company sought Chapter 11 Bankruptcy protection.

Procedural History

Brandt filed an Adversary proceeding against Player and Malone in the Chapter 11 case pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 544, 548, and 550 to avoid and recover the transfers made to them. Brandt prevailed, then had to collect from Horseshoe.

In the ensuing case in the District Court, Horseshoe moved for Summary Judgment under the aegis of the statutory “Good Faith” defense in 11 U.S.C. 550(b)(1). Horseshoe prevailed in the District Court.

Brandt appealed the District Court’s ruling, arguing that it had misinterpreted §550(b)(1) and, in addition, it should have granted his prior Motion to Compel production of documents related to investigations conducted by Horseshoe concerning Player.

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In the recent case of Beeman et. al. v. Borders Liquidating Trust et al. from the Circuit Court for the Southern District of New York decided on October 29, that Court examined what ought to happen when relief that could be granted, for practical reasons is not.

This controversial policy, referred to as “Equitable Mootness” means certain judgments will not be issued – even though they could – because doing so upsets the established order in a Bankruptcy case. It is obviously a touchy subject, but squarely within a court’s discretion.

Here, more than $17 Million had been distributed to creditors of Borders Bookstores in its Chapter 11 reorganization when 3 of its customers whose store gift cards became useless when it went bankrupt sought to be placed in a special “class” of claimants. The Plaintiffs started in the Bankruptcy Court but did not get traction there, so they proceeded in District Court.

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So you’re doing business as usual and notice that payments from your customer are getting later and later. Turns out that customer is struggling to navigate in the sputtering economy. Waiting for your money is bad enough; but what if you receive a demand to refund what you’ve been paid? And not because of anything you’ve done but because your customer has filed for Bankruptcy?

Sound like a nightmare? Actually, it happens everyday. So what do you do if you’re next? That was the question addressed in the recent New York case of Davis vs. Clark-Lift, in which a reorganizing Chapter 11 Debtor paid vendors later and later as it listed towards Bankruptcy. But even those lucky creditors who got paid could not escape the demand of the Trustee (Davis) to fork over what they had received.

As the Court in Davis explained, to set aside a payment as a “Preferential Transfer” under Section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code the moving Creditor or Trustee must established that the Debtor made it:

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Written by Jonathan Trent and Mazyar Hedayat  Edited by Mazyar M. Hedayat, Esq.

Small business remains the backbone of the most vibrant economy in the world. America leads in innovation and hard work thanks in large part to small businesses and entrepreneurs. But despite the best intentions of their owners small businesses have a high failure rate; especially in the first few years of operation. 

But why the high failure rate? One of the most common reasons is that the business owner, entrepreneur, or manager of the business 

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“90% of the credit cards lawsuits are flawed”

As the economy continues to sputter and consumers gasp for air, credit card issuers have been developing a strategy to cope with the chaos. Will they be offering longer terms? Lower interest rates? Perhaps rebates to long-time, loyal customers?

What? Me Worry?

Why bother trying to meet your customers half-way? If you’re a credit card issuer you have no downside. Are you out of money? Grab a taxpayer bailout.Have unemployment and bad debts skewed your risk profile? Jack up interest rates. Who’s going to stop you, right?

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